HISTORY OF ASIAN ALCOHOL CORPORATION

Plant facing Guimaras Strait

Plant facing Guimaras Strait

In February 1973, an alcohol distillery plant was constructed by Ayala Molasses Corporation in a sprawling ten (10) hectare lot at Brgy. Canjusa, Pulupandan, Negros Occidental. A few months after, a new corporation was formed and took over and appropriately called the plant by its corporate name, Asian Alcohol Corporation (AAC). The plant site is located thirty (30) kilometers south of Bacolod City, situated along side the sea facing Guimaras Strait.

Another distillery plant in Barangay Tugbungan, Consolacion, Cebu, with almost similar capacity was acquired by Asian Alcohol Corporation from its original owners, Island Alcohol Industries, about a year after the plant in Pulupandan was constructed. It got partially burned, however, three months after the plant start-up in 1973 and it took until 1975 before the Cebu plant became operational again. The Pulupandan plant on the other hand became operational on September 1974.

Distillery Building

Distillery Building

From an initial daily output in 1974 of 18,000 liters alcohol per day (LPD), the Pulupandan plant was successively expanded to 36,000 LPD and to 55,000 LPD in 1975 and 1977 respectively. The Cebu plant on the other hand had an initial capacity of 15,000 LPD and was expanded to 55,000 LPD in 1976. In 1978, the combined capacity of Pulupandan and Cebu plants was 110,000 liters alcohol per day.

In 1983, new columns from the United States of America (USA) were installed and, in 1984, the plant in Cebu was relocated to Pulupandan. These developments made AAC attain its biggest ever capacity of 210,000 LPD of fine quality potable alcohol plus the capability of producing 100,000 LPD of anhydrous alcohol intended to supply the needs of the government’s Alco-gas program.

In 1986, AAC expanded its business enterprises by merging with two other companies, namely Far East Molasses – engaged in molasses trading, and Total Bulk Corporation – engaged in molasses and alcohol handling. With these merger, AAC is now not only in alcohol manufacturing but, likewise in alcohol and molasses trading and bulk handling with port terminals in Manila, Cebu, Davao, Cagayan de Oro, Iloilo, Bicol, and Pulupandan.

In October 1991, AAC saw another dawn in its history when, it was acquired by the Lucio Tan Group of Companies (LTGC) from the Parsons family. Massive organizational and operational set-up overhauling was effected by the new management which resulted to a leaner, streamlined but responsive and effective organization.

wastewater treatment plant (WTP)

wastewater treatment plant (WTP)

Among the major projects implemented by the new management was the construction of the wastewater treatment plant (WTP) in 1995. When finally completed and operated in 1997, the WTP which cost AAC P120 million to build, became the show-case of an environment-friendly alcohol distillery plant in the country which uses its waste (slops) into energy (bio-gas). Because of this development, AAC has become one of the favorite itineraries for plant visits of students and professionals in the region.

Spurred by the growing market of the liquor industry, Asian Alcohol is presently embarking on another expansion program which would increase its production capacity to 310,000 LPD. Started in 1997, the expansion project aims for the acquisition and installation of additional equipment for its fermentation, distillation, steam generation, power generation, molasses storage, and cooling system facilities.

Because of this phenomenal growth, it is just fitting and proper to call Asian Alcohol Corporation by its more popular slogan, “The Philippine Spirit”.

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